Category: cabbage

Horray Halushki!

My comfort foods come in many shapes and sizes, but all share a common trait: they are all meals that I ate as a child. Peanut butter and cheese sandwiches, macaroni and cheese, baked beans… generally some simple, cheap, good stuff. Also on my list are a few of my mother’s Slovak dishes, including her incredible pasta dumplings, which she calls “Halushki.” Interestingly, a Google search for Halushki (as well as one for Haluski) did not return any results resembling the dumplings that I’ve grown up with – generally I found photos of broad, flat egg noodles fried up with cabbage. I’m thinking that somewhere along the way, either the translation was mixed up between my mother and my grandmother, or my grandmother had been making spaetzle while calling it halushki. In any case, it’s always been halushki to me, and it’s the most delicious food that I have ever eaten. I decided that those cabbage people were onto something, so, while I normally eat these with scrambled eggs, I tried it with fried brussels sprouts and golden onions. It did not disappoint. Being of Eastern European descent, cabbage and onions rank high on my list of comfort foods, so combining them with the pasta was a definite win all around! 
This is a pretty simple recipe and, unlike other laborious pastas, it comes together in a matter of minutes. My mother has a special “halushki pot” that she uses to press the dumplings through, but a large-holed colander will do just fine. Don’t have that either? Dropping tiny spoonfuls into the water will do just fine. If you like these pasta dumplings, you should also check out my Sweet Potato Gnudi recipe here! 

Haluski with Brussels Sprouts and Onions
an original recipe by allison sklar

ingredients

2 cups flour
1/2 cup warm water
2 eggs, beaten
a couple of pinches of salt
2 cups chopped brussels sprouts
1 large red onion, diced
1 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp smoked paprika
cracked black pepper
2 tbsp butter
2 tbsp oil (vegetable, canola, sunflower, etc.)
method

Combine flour and salt in large bowl. Make a well in the middle. Add eggs and water. Stir to combine, bringing in flour from the sides. If the dough feels dry, add a little more water, a tbsp at a time.
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Using an oiled, large holed collander, press dough holes, letting it drop into water. Alternately, fill a pastry bag with the mixture and pipe out quarter-sized drops at a time, or, drop by small spoonfuls. Once your pasta is in the water, it will start to move around, stir gently a couple of times. Pasta is ready once it floats to the top – about 5 minutes. Drain, toss with a bit of oil, and set aside. 
Heat oil in a frying pan. Once it’s hot, return heat to medium and add onions, stirring. Allow them to brown, about 8 to 12 minutes. Add cabbage and stir. Add butter and halushki. Continue cooking another 3 to 5 minutes. Serve sprinkled with cracked black pepper and paprika. Enjoy!

Honey Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts. Known only to some as “that food in movies that kids never eat,” Brussels sprouts have gotten a bad rap over the years, possibly due to the fact that people have been cooking them the wrong way. However, there is a reason that they’ve been experiencing a resurgence – and you’ll probably see them make an appearance a lot more often this Thanksgiving, Christmas & holiday season. These miniature cabbages of joy are sprouting up everywhere from upscale restos to food network kitchens. New age foodies have learned that when prepared and heated correctly, these little green powerhouses make for a tasty, tender, buttery dish. Now, what I’m about to say may shock you, so brace yourselves – YOU DON’T HAVE TO ADD BACON! I know, I know. Forget what all those other foodie sites & food network stars tell you. The secret to brussels sprouts that taste good ISN’T bacon. The secret is proper cooking time. To me, bacon is a cop-out. You’re basically adding it to mask the flavour that you don’t like. Thing is, if you make these little babies properly, they’re so delicious on their own that you don’t need the bacon at all. In fact, bacon would only distract from the natural tastiness. Before we get started, let me give you a few other pointers that’ll help amp up your brussels sprouts game in the future.

3 Things not to do with brussels sprouts:
1. Do not boil the living daylights out of them.
2. Do not boil the living daylights out of them.
3. Do not boil the living daylights out of them.

Great! Now that we’ve got that covered, remember: do not boil your brussels sprouts. This is a surefire way to make sure you’ll never eat them again. They become soggy, bitter, and truly unpalatable.

3 Things you should do with brussels sprouts:
1. Leave whole & steam them.
2. Finely chop & pan-fry them.
3. Half, glaze & roast them.

Today, I’m going to show you how to glaze and roast the tastiest brussels sprouts you’ve ever had.
So heat up your ovens, and get your sprout show on!

Oven Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Honey Glaze
an original recipe by allison sklar

ingredients
2 cups brussels sprouts, chopped in half, woody bottoms removed
2 tbsp honey
3 tbsp oil
1/4 tsp cracked black pepper
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp cayenne (optional)

In a medium sized bowl, whisk together honey and oil until homogenous. (If you’re having trouble stirring, it helps to heat the honey slightly in the microwave.) Add salt, pepper & cayenne. Toss brussels sprouts to coat. Transfer to greased baking dish (8″square should do the trick!). Roast in preheated oven at 400F for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring half way through. They are ready when golden and very tender.

Summer Slaw (Creamy Sesame Coleslaw)

Any time that I feel as if I’ve overeaten, or when I’ve drank too much, I find myself attempting to compensate the following day by consuming ridiculous amounts of vegetables, taking multivitamins, and drinking green smoothies.

Today has been one of those days.
The only problem? I was super hungry, and craving something creamy.
My fridge brimming with a medley of fresh fruits and veggies, I concluded that a salad with a creamy dressing would perfectly satisfy this craving all while ensuring that my veggie intake for the day remained at an all-time high.

Inspired by a bagged Asian-style salad that I tried out recently, I decided to make a creamy asian coleslaw – and to take it up a notch, I made it vegan! Now, I know what you non-vegans are thinking. How can you make something creamy without actual cream? The answer to this perplexing question- Vegenaise and tahini – a match made in vegan heaven!

Creamy (Vegan!) Sesame Coleslaw
an original recipe by allison sklar

what you’ll need 

for the salad
2 cups chopped mixed cabbage greens
1/2 cup asian-style fried noodles (such as these: La Choy Chow Noodles)
4 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
4 tbsp slivered roasted almonds

for the dressing
4 tbsp Vegenaise
2 tsp tahini
2 tsp sesame oil
3 tsp apple cider vinegar
2 tsp agave nectar
salt & pepper to taste

how to do it
Combine cabbage, noodles, cilantro and almonds. Whisk dressing ingredients together until creamy. Pour over cabbage mixture and toss to coat.

Note: if preparing ahead of time, only add noodles in just before serving, otherwise they will be soggy. Nobody likes a soggy noodle.