Category: cucumber

Juiced Up (Juice Recipes)

Juice cleanses (also known as juice fasts or juice feasts, depending on who you ask) seem to be all the rage these days. Popping up everywhere from celebrity gossip rags to health food blogs, many raw foodists, foodies, and everyday people swear by them. I’ve read multiple claims that a diet consisting of fresh juice will cleanse everything – from your skin, to your palate, to your colon, to your soul. While I’ve never been one for fad diets, this idea of a juice cleanse has intrigued me for months. A combination of my desire to hit the reset button on my eating patterns along with my absolute love of juice lead me to hop on this shiny new bandwagon for a little ride.

It lasted all of 6 hours.
Till I fell off.
And ate an entire container of hummus.
With a spoon.

So, be it! I will never be the kind of girl who can survive on juiced vegetables and supplements for weeks on end. Or even for a day. Still, those short few hours reminded me that I definitely am the kind of girl who likes to experiment with food. Finding myself in a slight cooking rut shortly after my return, I saw juicing as this fantastic opportunity to try new things. How many juice combinations could I make? So, so many. So many, that I decided to blog about it. Here, my friends, is a list of juicespirations. Oh, and a word of warning: beet juice tends to dye certain things red. Like your hands. Your clothes. Your juicer. And, well, your body waste – which can be frightening, but totally harmless. So drink it. A lot. Because it’s absolutely delicious. And so good for you. So, so good.


Juicespiratons

Tips: Wash all fruit and vegetables before juicing.
Peel when specified.
Drink immediately after juicing for best taste & maximum nutrients.
Transporting juice to work or school: Store juice in clean bottle with a crushed (chewable) vitamin C tablet to slow oxidation.
Do not juice: bananas, avocados, any pits & seeds.

Each recipe makes approximately 1 cup (250ml).

  • Red Power: 3 medium beetroots, peeled. 1 medium apple. (Best when mixed with equal parts water once juice is extracted.)
  • Invigorating Orange: 5 medium carrots, 3 slices pineapple, 1 tbsp ginger root
  • Summer Breeze: 1/2 medium cucumber, peeled. 1/2 cup cubed honeydew.
  • Fruitylexia: 6 large strawberries, greens removed.  2 kiwis, peeled. 2 apples.
  • Island Escape: 2 mangoes. 1/2 cup cubed pineapple. 1 peach. 
  • Wake Up: 3 pears, 1 apple, 1 tbsp ginger root
  • Apple Cobbler: 3 apples, 2 pears. Garnish with a cinnamon stick or a sprinkle of cinnamon.
  • Hidden Veg: 2 small carrots, 3 large romaine lettuce leaves, 2 mangoes
  • Refresh: 1/2 cup cubed watermelon, 1/2 cup raspberries
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You Just Might Make Friends With Salad. (This Time).

I’ve never liked lettuce.

Being a vegetarian for so many years, this fact has often startled people.  Each time that I tell someone that I dislike lettuce, the reaction that I receive generally follows the same pattern. It begins with a baffled, “but how could you not like lettuce?” And is often followed by ” So I guess you don’t eat salad, then?”

Ah, how I love receiving that follow-up question. Each and every time, I’ll respond with, “actually, I love salad.” I then adore watching the person’s facial transformation – twisting mouth and furrowing brow – as he or she becomes even more confused. If the person does not immediately conclude that I am simply delusional, I will begin my usual – salads-don’t-need-lettuce rant.

Salads do not (always) need lettuce.

Now, you may have heard that you don’t make friends with salad, but I think that that is only because most people are doing it all wrong. There are so many vegetable possibilities out there – all you need is two or three of them, and you’ve got yourself a salad. Lettuce-free.


My two favorite salad combinations are: 1. Cucumber, tomato and celery and 2. Spinach, dried cranberries and almonds. Lately, however, I’ve been on a more exotic/experimental gourmet salad kick. I started the week off with a fabulous concoction of pan-seared red pear slices, brie and chopped walnuts. And then, yesterday, I picked that – as I discovered today at lunch – is even tastier once it’s been marinating for a while. Unlike lettuce salads that become soggy a day later – this salad maintained it’s crunch beautifully.

Go ahead and make some friends.


Marinated Fennel & Cucumber Salad
 an original recipe by Allison Sklar

what you’ll need
for the dressing: 
1/8 cup rice vinegar (any other light-tasting vinegar will do)
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp mustard powder (acts as an emulsifier)
1 tsp dried crushed oregano
1/2 tsp garlic or onion powder (or both, if desired)
for the salad:
1/3 fennel bulb, chopped into thin slices
1 carrot, coarsely grated
2 lebanese cucumbers, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
handful toasted almond slices


how to do it
Combine all dressing ingredients and whisk until well blended. Toss vegetables to coat. Marinate for at least one hour – the longer, the better. If you desire lettuce, add some shredded iceberg just before serving.